EMV Card Processing

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Path to EMV
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Are you ready for EMV?
EMV 101

EMV is a new set of standards designed to protect debit and credit cards that are accepted at the point of sale, as well as ATM transactions. EMV chip-based payment cards, also known as smartcards, contain an embedded microprocessor, a type of small computer. The microprocessor chip contains the information needed to use the card for payment, and is protected by various security features.

EMV is not required! Yes, it is highly recommended but if by Oct, 2015 you have not made the shift to EMV capable POS equipment your ability to take credit card payments will not be turned off, but you will become liable for all expenses due to credit card fraud.

emv credit card services from NuRolPOS
EMV is about security and a liability shift.

It's better protection of card holder data (The data on a customer's credit card). EMV is a payment system that uses microchips instead of the commonly used mag stripe readers. The microchip enabled EMV card holds information unique to the user, allows for remote deactivation, and limits the capability of fraudsters to duplicate cards.

After the liability shift (Oct. 2015), if a merchant is still using the "swipe and signature" methodology and the customer has a smartcard, the merchant is liable. If the merchant has the new Chip and PIN technology but the bank hasn't issued the customer a Chip and PIN card, the bank is liable. If the merchant uses Chip and PIN technology on a customer's smartcard and fraud still takes place, the credit card company bears the liability, as is the case today.

Does this bring questions to mind?
Does my merchant service provide an EMV option?
Do I need to do something with my Point of sale system?
What EMV options are available to me?
Who can help me with more information about EMV?
Contact NuRol Point of Sale and we can help you answer these and any other question about EMV that you may have. We want to help you get on the path to EMV now.
Frequently Asked Questions

What is EMV? ^Top
While the EMV letters originally referred to the founding organizations from 1994-Europay, MasterCard and Visa.
Over the years, EMV has evolved from a single, chip-based contact specification to include EMV Contactless, EMV Common Payment Application (CPA), EMV Card Personalization, and EMV Tokenization. There are also EMV documents and materials regarding mobile payments. The common thread throughout "EMV" is a commitment to worldwide interoperability and acceptance of secure payment transactions.
EMV encompasses specifications, test procedures, and compliance processes managed by EMVCo, LLC, an organization jointly owned and operated by American Express, Discover, JCB, MasterCard, UnionPay and Visa.


Who will this effect? ^Top
Everybody making a face to face electronic payment in the US


Who has to make changes? ^Top
The merchant has to change by updating his POS hardware and/or software. The customer has to change because they will have new options to pay for their transaction using a chip embedded credit card, NFC (Apple Pay).


Why are EMV cards more secure than traditional cards? ^Top
It's that small, metallic square you'll see on new cards. That's a computer chip, and it's what sets apart the new generation of cards.
The magnetic strips on traditional credit and debit cards store unchanging data. Whoever accesses that data gains the sensitive card and cardholder information necessary to make purchases. That makes traditional cards prime targets for counterfeiters, who convert stolen card data to cash. Unlike magnetic-stripe cards, every time an EMV card is used for payment, the card chip creates a unique transaction code that cannot be used again.


What is the liability shift? ^Top
After an Oct. 1, 2015, deadline created by major U.S. credit card issuers MasterCard, Visa, Discover and American Express, the liability for card present fraud will shift to whichever party is the least EMV-compliant in a fraudulent transaction.
After the liability shift, if a merchant is still using the "swipe and signature" methodology and the customer has a smartcard, the merchant is liable. If the merchant has the new Chip and PIN technology but the bank hasn't issued the customer a Chip and PIN card, the bank is liable. If the merchant uses Chip and PIN technology on a customer's smartcard and fraud still takes place, the credit card company bears the liability, as is the case today.


What does this mean to me (business owner)? ^Top
To keep the liability for fraud on the banks you need to make sure you have the ability to process an EMV transaction before October. To do this you might have to get new hardware and upgrade your POS System.


What do I need to do? ^Top
Contact us to discuss your needs and point you in the right direction.


When should I do this? ^Top
The date is Oct 2015 when this needs to be done by. So don't wait. Every other retailer in the US is looking for the path to EMV. Find the path now to make sure you're ready by October.


How do I get started? ^Top
Call us at 1-800-390-6623 or Contact Us